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On your days off, be sure to expect calls begging you to come in. They don't pay you past 10pm, but don't allow you to collect money or finish off reports until 10pm, so you don't get out until at least 5 past every night, which means you end up accumulating minutes over a period of time - of unpaid work. Shop teams are pot luck, some are tight knit and a little hostile to newcomers, while most are more welcoming - this may serve as the only positive about this job and the annual travel card for full time workers Senior management management outside of the shops.

Can be very unprofessional and talk to you as if you are inferior and dumb. They make everyone unhappy and still expect us to jump through hoops to reach their 'targets' so that THEY look good to whomever manages them.

They will bark orders at you because they see you as beneath them and you can just forget about incentives. A lot of hardworking staff members are finding themselves with less job security due to failed age verifications - so it doesn't matter how much you sweat for your job, and work your butt off - they can still find something else to sack you with.

What I'm trying to say is, don't do it. Yes 33 No 1. Interesting and fast paced customer service role. Typical day at work I open the store, serve customers by taking their bets, translating them into the system and then pay winning bets out. I am responsible for ensuring policies and procedures are adhered to at all times, cash control, security, banking, staff management, recruitment and training, stock control, customer complaints and queries.

I am also responsible for Health and safety and other relevant paperwork and achieving targets that are given to me and my team by senior management. We work in small teams so we tend to work long hours, some of which are on our own in store. This job is quite challenging at times as I deal with responsible gambling and other sensitive issues involving money.

Job prospects are good with this company if you wish to progress as its a large company. I have learned a lot from this job and the skills that I have gained are transferable to many other roles. No day is the same, Interesting job. Long hours, No set rota. Yes 4 No 3. Rate your recent company. I got sacked for something I didn't do! I forgot to do a transfer and they told me I was falsifying company records for personal gain.

I had been spat and threatened with my life for that terrible job. Not only that you are constantly on edge and being harassed. Also you're effectively stealing from people daily. It is literally day light robbery. Some of the people you see in there have ruined their lives because of gambling, it truly shows how disgusting it is and how similar it is to crack.

Constantly have homeless people in there begging from you. It almost always stinks. Management don't care about their workers at all. If anyone wants a terrible job with no security and constant abuse, plus the lovely feeling of ruining peoples lives everyday then this is the job for you Yes 45 No 3. Working with some people was easier and more enjoyable than other members of staff. The management was absoloutly awful. A typical day was fun , enjoyable an lots of laughs but only when management from above shop level was not about.

Sociable job with majority of nice customers. William Hill is over all a good place to work, and would recommend it as a good job to gain experience in management, and customer service. However the job requires patience and dealing with a mild amount of abuse from unhappy customers in regards to them loosing money. It is definitely a job that revolves a great deal around team work, as there is only a small team per shop.

I am grateful enough to have a great working relationship with my colleagues. The job as a cashier is usually a hour shift per day, but since I have started management the hours are a bit more unsociable, varying from shift patterns such as 9am-3pm then a manager with swap with another and do 3pm The hardest part of the job is being constantly in control of money handling, and having to do regular security checks, and be accountable for all moneys and procedures in the shop.

The most enjoyable part of the job is working with a great shop team, and getting to know, and engage in conversations regular customers who come in everyday. Caters to personal needs, Good salary, regular customers. Long hours, can be very mentally straining dealing with certain customers. Yes 10 No 4. Needed a change. I spent 8 years at William Hill. Longer hours and increasing pressure decreased the fun and rewarding job that it used to be. The vast majority of branch managers lacked any idea of management and senior management was too overworked to notice.

Some branches can be quite hostile while others fun and exciting. There is genuine chance for career advancement simply by having a basic understanding of people management and applying yourself. I believe all roles are significantly underpaid, a strong decision in my leaving is that I don't believe workload is reflected in salary.

Yes 7 No 3. Yes 10 No 3. Very unprofesional and by more than 1 and way more than 1 occasion!! The whole industry is changing and i dont believe Hills are the worst but i would never work for this company again and would advise anyone against it to. Internal promotion. Long hours, poor training at shop level, no thanks when good figures acheived.

Yes 9 No 2. Deputy Manager Current Employee - edinburgh - 11 November Yes 17 No 1. A lot of pressure for the money. The job, for it's issues, is made by the customers and the staff, whom without, the job wouldn't be half as enjoyable. There is a great atmosphere between staff and customers, with a lot of 'banter' and friendliness which gets you through the day. However, the hours can be long, and you will need to work a couple of evenings a week on your own, and most weekends.

It's a very customer focused job but progression can be tricky after you become shop manager. Communication from senior management can be difficult at time but they are there for you when you can reach them and fully supportive.

StaySafe is an app based solution that is used by employers to protect their staff. It provides lone workers with a panic button and a range of alerts so they can summon help immediately — to their exact location — in an emergency.

Legally, anyone can work alone as long as a risk assessment has found that it is safe to do so. Lone working is usually completely safe once extra procedures have been put in place to minimize the additional risks lone workers face.

However, there are some instances where lone working should not be permitted if the job is high risk. For example, operating machinery which requires more than one person, visiting clients where there are concerns about violence or other environments where aggression is common, such as betting shops. To determine whether someone with a medical condition can work alone, you will need to consider employee medical conditions as part of your risk assessment and ensure there are procedures in place to protect them.

Employers should seek medical advice for specific employees if necessary. You should consider both routine work and foreseeable emergencies that may impose additional physical and mental burdens on an individual. An apprentice can work alone if it is safe to do so.

Employers have the same responsibility to apprentices as they do any other employee. Therefore, they hold a primary responsibility for the health and safety of the apprentice and are required to carry out risk assessments and put in place measures to manage any dangers.

A year-old can work alone if the organization employing them has conducted a risk assessment and found it safe to do so. Certain situations can put lone workers more at risk than others and in some circumstances, it may be better to not allow lone working at all. For example, some mental health care workers must work in pairs at all times when visiting certain patients as it has been deemed unsafe to go alone. It is down to you to ensure that you have undertaken a thorough risk assessment and if you cannot sufficiently mitigate the issues raised, then allowing lone working could put you in breach of your duty of care.

HSE guidance states that employers should ensure that they maintain regular contact with lone working employees and have a way to call for help in an uncomfortable or emergency situation. Conducting risk assessments is an integral part of adhering to health and safety legislation and meeting your duty of care to lone workers. Lone workers face a range of hazards and risks on a daily basis, that can differ from those based in a fixed or office environment.

A lone working risk assessment is a process of identifying and assessing risks associated with a job role carried out by a lone worker. When carrying out a risk assessment for lone working staff, you must consider hazards related to the work being carried out, the people they come into contact with and the different environments they travel and work in.

The purpose of the assessment is to identify what needs to be done to control health and safety risks for your lone workers. A dynamic risk assessment is the process of identifying risks in the current environment. This is an important skill that enables employees to make decisions regarding their own safety in any situation and one you should consider providing additional training on. Read more about dynamic risk assessments in our blog. Lone working risk assessments are a basic legal requirement and should be carried out for all employees.

It is often kept as part of your Lone Worker Policy. It is also useful to include on your written report who carried out the risk assessment, the date it was carried out, the date of any next steps and when the next review is due. To help you get started with writing your lone working risk assessment, we have created a comprehensive step by step guide, including a template document for you to use.

Lone workers require their own policies and procedures to ensure they are protected from any specific risks and hazards. A lone worker policy as an official written document that covers the risks faced by lone working staff and the responsibilities of both the employer and employee in ensuring that lone workers can work safely. It includes your lone worker risk assessment and practical instructions, as well as any details on any lone worker solutions in place and how to use them.

Creating your lone working policy is an important task and we understand that sometimes it can seem daunting. Getting your lone workers on board is perhaps the greatest challenge which is why we have put together these tips for creating your lone worker safety policy.

To ensure your lone workers understand and follow your policy, you should keep it as concise and simple as possible. Use language they would understand and clearly outline what is expected of them. Clarity is important, so consider the layout of the document as well as the language used. It is important that your policy is regularly updated whenever your risk assessment is reassessed or whenever you introduce new lone working policies, such as a new training course or implementing a lone worker solution.

In order to get your lone workers on board with your new lone worker policy, you should consider involving them in all aspects of the process. Ask them to help you identify risks and suggest ways they would feel safer. Once your lone working policy has been developed, consider holding a workshop or health and safety day where you can openly discuss why you have developed the policy and what has been put in place.

Be sure to focus on a clear safety message and the benefits to your lone workers. While you want to encourage adoption through focusing on employee safety and wellbeing, you also need your employees to understand that the policies and procedures you have implemented are a requirement and non-optional. Be direct in the language you use in your lone working policy. Your lone working policy will be developed as an extension to your lone working risk assessment.

The policy document will include your risk assessment and the lone worker procedures you have put in place to reduce or eliminate the identified risks. A lone worker procedure refers to a series of steps that need to be followed in order to work alone safely. You should document your lone worker procedures in your lone worker policy document.

You may find it useful to write a number of procedures suitable for different groups of employees so that they are able to digest the correct information easily. This is not an exhaustive list and there are many more scenarios that will require a lone worker procedure. However, implementing as many procedures as is necessary can save lives. When first introducing new work alone procedures, it is important to provide briefing and training for your lone workers so that they know exactly what is expected of them.

A written step-by-step guide should be distributed for them to refer to and it may be helpful to produce a safety checklist for your lone workers to follow until procedures become routine. Need some help getting started? We have created an in depth lone working policy guide and document template for you to use in your business. Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations, you must manage the risk to lone workers.

The HSE guidance for lone worker safety states that you must:. Historically companies have relied on diaries and buddy systems to keep in touch with lone workers. However, as with many industries, advancing technology is leading the way with regards to the solutions employers are choosing, leaving these manual methods outdated. This number is predicted to grow; worker safety devices based on GPS and cellular technology in Europe are expected to reach 1.

Typically lone worker apps consist of the app itself, which has a range of functions including panic button, GPS location, timed sessions, man down alerts and check-ins. Employee activity and the location of staff whilst at work is monitored via a cloud based hub where employers can respond to any alerts.

Lone worker apps are particularly suitable in the current climate because of how well they lend themselves to being trialled, rolled out and utilized by staff remotely. You now no longer need to be in the same room, or even the same country, to be able to roll out and use a product successfully.

At a time when supply chains are likely to be majorly disrupted, this is a big advantage. Monitors can be trained to use a system remotely via WebEx and staff protected quickly. Alternatively, the monitoring of staff can be outsourced to professional monitoring firms who will handle any alerts.

StaySafe was at the forefront of the safety app revolution, having first entered the market in Now used by tens of thousands of employees across five continents, our easy-to-use app and monitoring hub allows lone workers to raise an alert in a range of situations while providing monitors with the accurate locations of employees while they work alone.

Organizations who choose StaySafe do so because it is so easy and simple to use, with no capital outlay — most employees already use a cellphone everyday. It is scalable for use in any business, in any industry — we work with Ericsson to Oxfam and everyone in between. We also provide a full end-to-end service — including innovative in app training — to ensure you and your staff get the most from the app and are protected everyday.

Our intuitive app allows employees to check in safely following a lone working session and raise an alert in an emergency. Guide to lone working. Guide to Lone Working. Risk Assessment Guide. Policy and Procedures. What is a lone worker? What are the hazards and risks of lone working? Explore the hazards and risks faced by lone workers in different environments and job roles.

UK lone worker legislation Understand the health and safety guidance that regulates lone working in the UK and what you are required to put in place in order to meet your duty of care. Who can work alone? We answer the question of who can work alone by looking at groups of potentially vulnerable or high-risk employees. Lone worker risk assessments What is a lone worker risk assessment and what should be included?

Creating a lone worker policy How to create a lone worker policy, including checklists to ensure you include everything you need. How can I keep my lone workers safe? We outline the practical ways in which you can protect your lone working staff from harm, including apps, panic buttons, wearable technology and satellite devices.

What are the hazards of lone working? Lone worker risk assessment guide Lone working policy and procedures How can I keep my lone workers safe? What is the HSE definition of a lone worker? Those working on the same site but out of sight and sound of a colleague Colleagues working alone in different parts of a building Employees left alone for periods of time while a colleague takes a break A single employee working late after everyone else has left the worksite Anyone working alone but alongside members of the public or in populated locations Staff travelling alone during work hours Staff members who work from home.

What types of jobs involve lone working? Download our guide to lone worker solutions. How can security be achieved in the workplace? Find out why businesses use StaySafe. Violence at work Violence and threats are even more common than sustaining injury at work. What are the risks of lone working?

How many lone workers are attacked every day? How high risk is lone working? What types of risks do lone workers face? The main risks associated with lone working include people, environmental risks and ill health. People risk Unfortunately, lone workers are at higher risk of violence and aggression and are often regarded as easier targets. Environmental risk Lone workers are at risk from workplace hazards such as slips, trips and falls, heavy lifting and electrocution.

Ill health Similarly, if a lone worker suffers from a medical emergency such as a heart attack or fainting, receiving immediate support and alerting emergency services could prove difficult without nearby colleagues, particularly if working remotely or out of sight and sound.

Risks of lone working in different environments Different environments pose different sets of risks for lone working staff and in many industries the dangers faced by staff — especially violence — are increasing. Risks of lone working in the community. Risks of lone working alongside the public. Risks of lone working in construction.

Risks of lone working in utilities and field service. Risks of working alone at night. Aggression and violence in the retail industry. Attacks on housing staff. Risks of lone working in the property industry. Risks of lone working for property and Estate Agents Estate agents are some of the most well known lone workers. Risks of home working. You should consider: How will you keep in touch with them?

What work activity will they be doing and for how long? Can it be done safely? Do you need to put control measures in place to protect them? UK Lone worker legislation. What is the lone worker legislation in the UK? Who regulates lone worker legislation in the UK?

Is lone working legal? What is my responsibility when it comes to lone workers? You can help to reduce the risks to lone workers by: Conducting thorough lone worker risk assessments Producing a written health and safety policy and ensuring all employees understand it Taking steps to reduce or eliminate risk in order to create a safe working environment Providing information, instruction, lone worker training and supervision where appropriate Regularly reviewing and improving upon lone worker risk assessments and policies Many employers also use specific lone worker solutions to ensure their staff are safe and can quickly call for help in an emergency.

The main changes were: 1 A move from outcome based sentencing to risk based sentencing Previously, prosecution was based on the outcome of an accident or incident. This means that if an employee is exposed to a risk that could result in injury or death, the business can be prosecuted before an incident occurs 2 Increased fines Fines for health and safety breaches increased dramatically starting as high as the millions and are now given for exposure to risk.

Failure to comply with health and safety legislation is likely to lead to; Large fines reaching as high as millions Additional costs associated with compensation, resources and legal costs Lost reputation and ultimately business Stop work orders Imprisonment of the individuals found responsible Download our guide: Legal, Moral, Financial: building a business case for lone worker safety. What must the employer of a lone worker do? Carry out a lone worker risk assessment Risk assessments for lone working are a basic legal requirement and should be carried out for all employees.

Find out more about Risk Assessments. Produce a lone worker policy Following on from your risk assessment, you will need to produce a safety policy for your lone workers. Find out more about working alone policy and procedures.

Provide lone worker training For lone working staff, training is particularly important as they work in environments where there are no colleagues around to provide a helping hand or point out a mistake that could lead to an accident.

Find out more about StaySafe. Can someone with medical conditions work alone? Can an apprentice work alone? Can a year-old work alone? When is lone working not allowed? Supervising lone workers HSE guidance states that employers should ensure that they maintain regular contact with lone working employees and have a way to call for help in an uncomfortable or emergency situation.

Lone worker risk assessment guide. What is a lone worker risk assessment? The purpose of the assessment is to identify what needs to be done to control health and safety risks for your lone workers What is a dynamic risk assessment?

Read more about dynamic risk assessments in our blog Are lone working risk assessments a legal requirement? How do I create a lone worker risk assessment?

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We expect staff to enforce consumer protection measures and to verify the age of gamblers. At the same time, they have to police fixed odds betting terminals. Speak to somebody who works in a betting shop today and they will tell you how difficult it is for staff to oversee FOBT usage if they are on their own.

In addition, they have to get on with the job that they are employed to do. When someone works alone in a shop, they are expected to do all that as well as take and settle bets. Ultimately, employees are being asked to work as both cashier and manager at the same time, and often they are not paid any extra for working what are in effect two jobs. Following a meeting with Ladbrokes yesterday, I was pleased to hear that such workers receive a supplement of 30p an hour, which is a promising move in the right direction.

We often talk about problem gambling and I am aware of some good self-exclusion schemes from bookmakers such as William Hill and Ladbrokes. The problem is that staff cannot enforce such schemes and combat problem gambling if they are working alone, which has been highlighted by those working in the industry. One bookmaker spoke to his union, Community, about the problems that single staffing causes when trying to deal with problem gambling.

He said:. As we often lone work, I have been unable to interact with these customers. I have been in the betting industry for over 30 years, and over the past 5 years I have seen more and more customers with gambling problems. Lone working makes these issues hard to deal with. Lone-working policies are preventing staff from performing the duties that their employers expect of them.

Most worrying is the way in which single staffing can make betting shop staff vulnerable to incidents of violence. I commend the hon. Gentleman, who is knowledgeable about such matters and is always worth listening to. On safety, does he agree that the Safe Bet Alliance, which has been set up to conduct a risk assessment of single manning, has been praised by the police for reducing levels of crime and that, under the scheme, single manning is used only after a risk assessment that is endorsed by the police and others?

I think that the hon. Gentleman and I are the only two Members who have worked in bookmakers and who actually know what it is like on the coalface— to use a Welsh term. He is right about the Safe Bet Alliance, and I spoke extensively with William Hill and Ladbrokes, both of which are signed up, before this debate.

I will develop that point later in my speech. I thank the hon. Gentleman for his intervention and I am glad that someone else with betting shop experience is here today. If it is true that violence in betting shops is increasing, bookmakers and Ministers have a responsibility to act to protect staff at work. I want to draw attention to several cases that give an indication of the level of violence to which betting shop staff can be vulnerable when working alone.

Community recently asked its members to provide their stories and experiences of single manning and I have heard further stories that indicate the risks of working alone. One betting shop worker was fortunate to escape uninjured after his store was robbed while he was single manning. I had spoken with him and he pretended that there was something wrong with the machine.

I had to go out from behind the counter to deal with it and he came up behind me with a hammer. Thankfully, I was not physically hurt but following the robbery I could not return to work for over a month. Such stories demonstrate the need for a commitment on the part of the betting industry to tackle the issues caused by single staffing and lone working. I want CCTV to be compulsory, so that staff can feel secure in the knowledge that what goes on in a shop is properly monitored, and I am pleased that some steps are being taken in such areas.

Community has told me that it has had more engagement with firms like Betfred in recent months and is holding meetings to discuss its current restructuring. I also wrote to William Hill to ask what measures it was taking to combat this problem. It is trialling a system in its shops that will ensure that any shop policy is dictated by how best to protect shop staff. It tells me that shops designated as high risk under their security risk assessment process, as mentioned by Philip Davies , were excluded from the recent lone-working trial.

William Hill has assured me that it has also undertaken a shop-by-shop risk assessment. Of particular importance is the fact that it has consulted heavily with staff. There are also some fantastic campaigns that are working to draw attention to the problems caused by lone working. Campaigns such as that are extremely important if we are to get the betting industry to respond positively to the problems.

As I mentioned, yesterday I met representatives of Ladbrokes, who assured me that they are working on ways to improve their situation such as implementing a code of practice, with the aim that it should be in place by 1 March. I was also informed of the new till technology that it is trying to set up whereby if tills become inactive over a certain time, an alarm is sent to the security office who will be alerted to the situation.

The code of practice is intended to help gamblers by providing alerts. I was pleased to hear of that and wish that such practice was in place right across the industry. Does the hon. Gentleman think that the way forward is for the issue to be dealt with on an industry basis through a voluntary code of conduct, rather than through Government legislation? That is the nub of my speech. We need to start with a voluntary code and monitor the situation.

If it is working, it should be rolled out across the industry. If it is not working, we need to revisit the matter with legislation. I am asking for a common-sense solution to sometimes volatile situations. I want compulsory double-locking on doors, compulsory CCTV and compulsory panic alarms, so that if people are threatened, they can hit the alarm and help will come.

There is something else in which I would be interested. The Ladbrokes policy is always to send someone out when a panic alarm goes off, even if it is a false alarm, just to be sure—someone might have been hit, or they might be on the floor and cannot be seen, or something like that. The hon. Gentleman and I both have experience of working in betting shops, and in my case often alone. Many of them are independent shops, which is my background and my biggest concern.

Putting too many requirements on independent betting shops might make them unviable, and we could end up not with single-manned betting shops but with no betting shops and nobody in work. I have the same background as the hon. I also worked in single-staffed independent betting shops. We need seriously to consider a voluntary code and see how it runs out.

If a voluntary code does not work, we can revisit it and have another discussion at another time. My hon. Friend is making a very good speech. What would he say to a constituent of mine who works in an independent bookmakers and who shall remain anonymous? Does my hon. Friend feel that that practice should be addressed by the bookmaking industry and should not be allowed, particularly in the independent sector? I agree with my hon.

I used to cash up at night, as I am sure the hon. Member for Shipley did. Sometimes on a Saturday I walked on the street with thousands of pounds in my pocket. Someone could have followed me from the betting shop as I walked to the post office to cash in. Philip Davies is nodding, and perhaps we are united on wanting to address the issue.

My constituent is a young female, so does my hon. After I left the betting shop, I worked in a bank. Compared with the level of security that we had at the betting shop, the Securicor van would turn up at the bank and the staff would be wearing armour and helmets to take the money away. The bank had security measures in place, which the betting industry needs to consider. An interesting idea is that the marketplace manager, who looks after three or four shops, should take the takings and have security measures in place.

A lot of people do not realise that the working day in a betting shop does not end when the last race goes off. Staff still have half an hour in which to cash up and settle outstanding bets. Takings fell. Broadly speaking, there was less profit for bookmakers there: in football, unlike in a or rider horse race, only one side could fail to win. Takings fell further. FOBTs, when they came, were accepting of much larger sums than the fruit machines that preceded them. Losers lost faster, and losing became an identifiably scratchier thing.

Staff explained: the customer who backed a too-slow horse or a crap dog might afterwards rail at fate or the gods, or even the employees behind their counters. But they could not plausibly claim to have been cheated. Machine players brought with them a new paranoia.

FOBTs are fixed, thus the name — fixed-odds betting terminals. Over time they will pay back to customers Many shop workers I spoke to had stories about looking on, impotent, as the machines under their charge were angrily destroyed by the customers who had been playing them.

Worse, somehow, was when a machine was calmly destroyed. According to figures I have seen, the number of incidents of damage to machines in Ladbrokes branches rose steadily between and And how many casinos, they asked, got by without bouncers to cope with aggrieved gamblers?

How many were run by individuals on their own? The policy meant that, subject to certain conditions, including a risk assessment of individual branches and a tick-box check of employee competence, shops could be run by one person for periods of the day and night. In fact, in the majority of shops, there would be a mandatory number of hours during which there could only be one person rostered to work.

People at all levels of the company told me they were in no doubt as to why it was introduced. Ladbrokes said this was a result of cuts in staffing at all levels, not specifically on shop floors. At shop level, a choice: work on your own, or risk your job. At first, those who agreed to single-man were paid extra — something like an additional 40p an hour. The hourly pay for branch managers, who are known internally at Ladbrokes as customer service managers, varies by area and age.

Internal Ladbrokes sources spoke candidly to me on the condition that I not use their names. So did most of the dozens of betting shop workers I consulted for this story. Entering branches around the UK, and introducing myself as a reporter, I became used to a singular response: behind the counter their eyes would flick, instinctively, to the nearest CCTV camera. Employees said they feared the sack if they complained in public forums about their working conditions.

A Ladbrokes employee in Birmingham reported the same. Many of the part-time-working students and other junior staff I interviewed insisted they did not expect to be in their jobs for ever, that a pervasive industry gloom would soon flush them out — but that they needed good references, so could their names be left out of my story? I met working parents, working parents-to-be, second-generation staff who worked in branches with their parents, and other employees who could not risk dismissal, so asked to speak anonymously.

But they spoke. The area manager in the north recalled his shame at telling staff who were unnerved by single-manning in its early phase that they were really in no extra danger. Persuading his staff became easier when other major betting chains started to single-man. Employees at Betfred, Stan James, Coral and Paddy Power told me they were all asked to work in their shops alone on a frequent basis.

Andrew and Anita Iacovou first met inside a Ladbrokes. It was a Saturday in April , Grand National weekend. Anita had put an each-way bet on a horse called Party Politics. When her horse finished second, she took her ticket to Iacovou, who was working behind the counter. They started talking. Iacovou was 37 and had grown up not far away, in South Norwood.

His father was Greek and his mother English. Anita was 34, second-generation Indian, with dark hair that she tied back in a knot. Iacovou must have been distracted, chatting, because he shorted Anita on her winnings. They married in and later had two sons. In , the family moved to a flat in Cheam. For five years, until , Iacovou worked at a Ladbrokes a walk away, on Tudor Drive. Then he was moved to the branch near Morden tube. But after a while, Punjabi recalled, Iacovou asked him not to bring the family on these trips, fearing they would be vulnerable in the car outside.

The sensation of safety is not a hard currency; it cannot be passed around in token form. The Morden Ladbrokes had CCTV cameras inside it, a steel-framed front door with a magnetic lock, a latch-lock on the door between the shop floor and the service area, and an employee panic button under the counter. As dozens of shop employees pointed out to me, however, it is still possible to feel unsafe in the middle of a fortress like this, particularly at night, particularly when unaccompanied.

The deputy manager of a Betfred in Sussex was working on her own when one night she was threatened with rape by a frustrated machine gambler. For a while she took anti-anxiety medication, she said, to be able to keep working, and then she resigned. Certain branches in certain areas were from the start deemed too dangerous to be single-manned. Part of the way Ladbrokes decided this was by considering unpleasant incidents that had already taken place inside a shop.

It rated such incidents by degree. Suffer enough twos or threes and head office would take a shop off the single-manning list, at least for a short while. Anita worried for her husband. You did not have to search especially hard for stories about violence in British betting shops at the time.

A machete robbery at a Betfred in Ashton-in-Makerfield in March A man who had entered a Ladbrokes in Southampton in April , and leapt over the counter with a kitchen knife. Between them, the Iacovous had an arrangement: Andrew would call Anita from his shop, usually at about 8. On Saturday 25 May, Anita did not receive the expected call. She rang the shop and got no answer. She continued to call. Trying to work out what had happened later, police investigators rewatched CCTV footage recorded in the shop.

They saw Shafique Aarij struggle with Iacovou behind the counter. This was at 8. They saw Aarij hit Iacovou with a hammer, multiple times. Blood spotted his face, and he wiped at it. Within minutes of the attack Aarij had left the shop. Aarij must have taken this when he fled, at around 8. For between 45 minutes and an hour, nobody outside the Morden branch was aware that anything unusual had happened inside.

Andrew Iacovou lay in such a way behind his counter that he could not be seen from the shop floor. Customers came and went. Someone played on one of the machines. Eventually Kistensamy, one of the regulars, approached the counter and saw a body. He ran to the supermarket next door and raised the alarm. An ambulance came. Iacovou was pronounced dead by paramedics at From branch to branch, rumours of a murder spread. Staff at a William Hill in Glasgow heard that an employee had been stabbed.

At a Coral in Hemel Hempstead it was said that someone had been shot. Robbery gone wrong? Was he single-manning? This was one of their great fears. In the Facebook group, a discussion about possible strike action led nowhere. A hopeless, gravedigger humour set in instead. I was told by well-placed sources that this rumour was accurate. The operator also saw the cleaning materials that Iacovou had put out on his service area. It was assumed that Aarij was a cleaner who must have pressed the panic button by mistake.

In Cheam, Anita Iacovou heard nothing all morning. At 2pm, police visited her at the flat. Anita was asked to step in to her bedroom to speak with a policewoman. The two children were at home. Anita called them into the room to tell them what had happened. There is not a lot more she can recall of the afternoon. She knows she turned to the two Ladbrokes representatives, in the family living room, and asked: why was he ever left there alone?

When interviewed at Sutton police station, Aarij accepted that he had gone to the betting shop in Morden that morning to steal money. That he had armed himself with a hammer beforehand. That he knew there was likely to be only one person on duty. At trial in November he was found guilty.

In January he was sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum of 26 years. Ladbrokes paid a modest sum to Anita Iacovou and her family. Delicate mention was made of the murder. When a new branch opened in the Leicester area that year, it was added, like hundreds of others, to the list of Ladbrokes that could be run by one person. In early , a woman in her 20s was interviewed for a job at the branch. During her interview, Miss X asked about the possibility of the shop being robbed.

Really, though, nobody in the betting world can look forward to the spring, when chancellors generally shake down this industry with indecent rigour. In a decade when the high street has come out strongly in favour of thrift and convenience, betting shops have clung on as an unlikely modern super-presence. Of course, they are not much use to the thrifty. If you mislay your little receipt, write it off. Who are all the shops for? Usually men. Their expressions often sullen.

Privately, informally, staff divide the modern class of betting-shop punter into two broad groups: the Older Gentlemen in for the horses and the Machine Gamblers. He just seemed to want a place to be, and often cleaned up the discarded betting slips to help out. Bookmakers buy lots of television advertising time to promote gambling through their websites and mobile-phone apps, while their vast estates of retail outlets go just about unmentioned.

Betting shops can seem marginal places today, even through the eyes of those who run them. Yet as pubs vanish, churches vanish, libraries vanish, the marginalised have not vanished. I soon realised that I only had to speak to men on the street — those who looked to be of retirement age and who looked to be doing nothing in particular. They had dispersed, since his death, to the Paddy Power a few hundred metres away, to the Stan James across the road, to the Ladbrokes on Tudor Drive, to the William Hill further along the A Who are all these shops for?

Four ought to be enough. An unintended effect of the Gambling Act may have been to encourage bookmakers to open more shops, and to move existing shops from the back streets to more visible parts of cities and towns. Locals in Great Yarmouth recently campaigned to stop a ninth betting shop opening in the town centre. Last year, residents of Thornton Heath tried to resist a 14th betting shop opening within a single postal district.

After , bookmakers began to open their shops earlier in the morning and later at night. According to the ABB, this was to broadcast and take bets on evening sporting events. But senior industry employees told me that it was to create extra hours of machine use — a feeling shared on shop floors. When I questioned the ABB about single-manning and other working conditions in betting shops, a spokesman pointed out that those who work in petrol stations and newsagents often do so alone.

Other industry sources said that lorry drivers and taxi drivers worked solo, too. The comparisons were not unfair, but they did not take full account of the nature of betting shops, or their peculiar presence. Known to be everywhere, known to have cash. As likely as not staffed by a woman, more likely than not staffed alone. They were often near pubs, nightclubs, takeaways, cab ranks. They stayed open late. Ever since the extension of opening hours, branch workers told me, they had been more likely to have to deal with customers who were drunk or on drugs.

They also told me about the other sort of difficult customer: the non-customer, bewildered, unstable, otherwise desperate, drifting in because they could not reliably expect to idle anywhere else during unsociable hours without being ushered on. An employee of Ladbrokes in Birmingham, Harry Vale, was taken aback in to be asked by his area manager to start buying food and drink for people who came into his shop.

But, then, Vale was pretty new to the business at the time, and a great many industry conventions can seem baffling to the uninitiated. That they had to be on the shop floor at all times. That the only time they were allowed to stay behind the counter was if they felt they had a very specific threat. Mia Whitaker, 21 that year, was working in a Ladbrokes in the Moor area of Sheffield.

She had good reason to want to stay behind her counter, her own Ladbrokes experience having been made horrible by two regulars, young taxi drivers, who came in to play the FOBTs or to watch sport. They offered taunting comments and gestures, coming in at night and when she was alone in the branch. Her manager suggested instead that he have a quiet word with the drivers — they were regular customers. The taxi drivers knew what her hours were, and where her bus stop was.

So for more than a year after that, until Whitaker left the job, the men kept coming into their local betting shop, where they could expect to play the machines, or to watch the evening darts, and to harass the year-old who was nominally in charge.

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Job prospects are good with this company if you wish to progress as its a large company. I have learned a lot from this job and the skills that I have gained are transferable to many other roles. No day is the same, Interesting job. Long hours, No set rota. Yes 4 No 3. Rate your recent company.

I got sacked for something I didn't do! I forgot to do a transfer and they told me I was falsifying company records for personal gain. I had been spat and threatened with my life for that terrible job. Not only that you are constantly on edge and being harassed. Also you're effectively stealing from people daily. It is literally day light robbery. Some of the people you see in there have ruined their lives because of gambling, it truly shows how disgusting it is and how similar it is to crack.

Constantly have homeless people in there begging from you. It almost always stinks. Management don't care about their workers at all. If anyone wants a terrible job with no security and constant abuse, plus the lovely feeling of ruining peoples lives everyday then this is the job for you Yes 45 No 3. Working with some people was easier and more enjoyable than other members of staff.

The management was absoloutly awful. A typical day was fun , enjoyable an lots of laughs but only when management from above shop level was not about. Sociable job with majority of nice customers. William Hill is over all a good place to work, and would recommend it as a good job to gain experience in management, and customer service.

However the job requires patience and dealing with a mild amount of abuse from unhappy customers in regards to them loosing money. It is definitely a job that revolves a great deal around team work, as there is only a small team per shop. I am grateful enough to have a great working relationship with my colleagues. The job as a cashier is usually a hour shift per day, but since I have started management the hours are a bit more unsociable, varying from shift patterns such as 9am-3pm then a manager with swap with another and do 3pm The hardest part of the job is being constantly in control of money handling, and having to do regular security checks, and be accountable for all moneys and procedures in the shop.

The most enjoyable part of the job is working with a great shop team, and getting to know, and engage in conversations regular customers who come in everyday. Caters to personal needs, Good salary, regular customers. Long hours, can be very mentally straining dealing with certain customers. Yes 10 No 4.

Needed a change. I spent 8 years at William Hill. Longer hours and increasing pressure decreased the fun and rewarding job that it used to be. The vast majority of branch managers lacked any idea of management and senior management was too overworked to notice. Some branches can be quite hostile while others fun and exciting. There is genuine chance for career advancement simply by having a basic understanding of people management and applying yourself.

I believe all roles are significantly underpaid, a strong decision in my leaving is that I don't believe workload is reflected in salary. Yes 7 No 3. Yes 10 No 3. Very unprofesional and by more than 1 and way more than 1 occasion!! The whole industry is changing and i dont believe Hills are the worst but i would never work for this company again and would advise anyone against it to.

Internal promotion. Long hours, poor training at shop level, no thanks when good figures acheived. Yes 9 No 2. Deputy Manager Current Employee - edinburgh - 11 November Yes 17 No 1. A lot of pressure for the money. The job, for it's issues, is made by the customers and the staff, whom without, the job wouldn't be half as enjoyable. There is a great atmosphere between staff and customers, with a lot of 'banter' and friendliness which gets you through the day. However, the hours can be long, and you will need to work a couple of evenings a week on your own, and most weekends.

It's a very customer focused job but progression can be tricky after you become shop manager. Communication from senior management can be difficult at time but they are there for you when you can reach them and fully supportive. Yes 6 No 3. Management and customer service skills were used on a daily basis and all other tasks involved banking daily taken bets understanding off products being promoted. Yes 4 No 2. Embarrsingly Bad. A typical day consists of dealing with customers, some of which are diamonds, some quite simply, are not.

Be very careful when applying for this company, it is quite simply the biggest regret of my working life. I gave absolutely everything to the company, but middle management up just don't care. You will have holidays cancelled, be working on your own before and after the inevitable robbery, don't expect support because DOMs upwards do not have a clue about the shops.

The co-workers are the best part of the company, they are in the same boat, everyone is unappreciated. Good luck with responsible gambling, its all just a front, they want to take every penny, and don't like winning punters see 'Speaking with Forked Tounges' Quite simply there is no enjoyment in working 4 x 14 hour shifts in a row.

Everything Else. Yes 19 No 5. What a drain on your life. Don't apply if you like seeing friends and family as you will soon lose touch with them once management get you working 60hr weeks then not paying you correctly and lying saying you haven't done the hours just so they can make more and more money.

Going home. Lone working is usually completely safe once extra procedures have been put in place to minimize the additional risks lone workers face. However, there are some instances where lone working should not be permitted if the job is high risk.

For example, operating machinery which requires more than one person, visiting clients where there are concerns about violence or other environments where aggression is common, such as betting shops. To determine whether someone with a medical condition can work alone, you will need to consider employee medical conditions as part of your risk assessment and ensure there are procedures in place to protect them.

Employers should seek medical advice for specific employees if necessary. You should consider both routine work and foreseeable emergencies that may impose additional physical and mental burdens on an individual. An apprentice can work alone if it is safe to do so. Employers have the same responsibility to apprentices as they do any other employee. Therefore, they hold a primary responsibility for the health and safety of the apprentice and are required to carry out risk assessments and put in place measures to manage any dangers.

A year-old can work alone if the organization employing them has conducted a risk assessment and found it safe to do so. Certain situations can put lone workers more at risk than others and in some circumstances, it may be better to not allow lone working at all. For example, some mental health care workers must work in pairs at all times when visiting certain patients as it has been deemed unsafe to go alone.

It is down to you to ensure that you have undertaken a thorough risk assessment and if you cannot sufficiently mitigate the issues raised, then allowing lone working could put you in breach of your duty of care.

HSE guidance states that employers should ensure that they maintain regular contact with lone working employees and have a way to call for help in an uncomfortable or emergency situation. Conducting risk assessments is an integral part of adhering to health and safety legislation and meeting your duty of care to lone workers. Lone workers face a range of hazards and risks on a daily basis, that can differ from those based in a fixed or office environment.

A lone working risk assessment is a process of identifying and assessing risks associated with a job role carried out by a lone worker. When carrying out a risk assessment for lone working staff, you must consider hazards related to the work being carried out, the people they come into contact with and the different environments they travel and work in. The purpose of the assessment is to identify what needs to be done to control health and safety risks for your lone workers.

A dynamic risk assessment is the process of identifying risks in the current environment. This is an important skill that enables employees to make decisions regarding their own safety in any situation and one you should consider providing additional training on. Read more about dynamic risk assessments in our blog.

Lone working risk assessments are a basic legal requirement and should be carried out for all employees. It is often kept as part of your Lone Worker Policy. It is also useful to include on your written report who carried out the risk assessment, the date it was carried out, the date of any next steps and when the next review is due. To help you get started with writing your lone working risk assessment, we have created a comprehensive step by step guide, including a template document for you to use.

Lone workers require their own policies and procedures to ensure they are protected from any specific risks and hazards. A lone worker policy as an official written document that covers the risks faced by lone working staff and the responsibilities of both the employer and employee in ensuring that lone workers can work safely.

It includes your lone worker risk assessment and practical instructions, as well as any details on any lone worker solutions in place and how to use them. Creating your lone working policy is an important task and we understand that sometimes it can seem daunting. Getting your lone workers on board is perhaps the greatest challenge which is why we have put together these tips for creating your lone worker safety policy. To ensure your lone workers understand and follow your policy, you should keep it as concise and simple as possible.

Use language they would understand and clearly outline what is expected of them. Clarity is important, so consider the layout of the document as well as the language used. It is important that your policy is regularly updated whenever your risk assessment is reassessed or whenever you introduce new lone working policies, such as a new training course or implementing a lone worker solution.

In order to get your lone workers on board with your new lone worker policy, you should consider involving them in all aspects of the process. Ask them to help you identify risks and suggest ways they would feel safer. Once your lone working policy has been developed, consider holding a workshop or health and safety day where you can openly discuss why you have developed the policy and what has been put in place.

Be sure to focus on a clear safety message and the benefits to your lone workers. While you want to encourage adoption through focusing on employee safety and wellbeing, you also need your employees to understand that the policies and procedures you have implemented are a requirement and non-optional.

Be direct in the language you use in your lone working policy. Your lone working policy will be developed as an extension to your lone working risk assessment. The policy document will include your risk assessment and the lone worker procedures you have put in place to reduce or eliminate the identified risks. A lone worker procedure refers to a series of steps that need to be followed in order to work alone safely.

You should document your lone worker procedures in your lone worker policy document. You may find it useful to write a number of procedures suitable for different groups of employees so that they are able to digest the correct information easily. This is not an exhaustive list and there are many more scenarios that will require a lone worker procedure.

However, implementing as many procedures as is necessary can save lives. When first introducing new work alone procedures, it is important to provide briefing and training for your lone workers so that they know exactly what is expected of them. A written step-by-step guide should be distributed for them to refer to and it may be helpful to produce a safety checklist for your lone workers to follow until procedures become routine.

Need some help getting started? We have created an in depth lone working policy guide and document template for you to use in your business. Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations, you must manage the risk to lone workers. The HSE guidance for lone worker safety states that you must:.

Historically companies have relied on diaries and buddy systems to keep in touch with lone workers. However, as with many industries, advancing technology is leading the way with regards to the solutions employers are choosing, leaving these manual methods outdated. This number is predicted to grow; worker safety devices based on GPS and cellular technology in Europe are expected to reach 1.

Typically lone worker apps consist of the app itself, which has a range of functions including panic button, GPS location, timed sessions, man down alerts and check-ins. Employee activity and the location of staff whilst at work is monitored via a cloud based hub where employers can respond to any alerts. Lone worker apps are particularly suitable in the current climate because of how well they lend themselves to being trialled, rolled out and utilized by staff remotely.

You now no longer need to be in the same room, or even the same country, to be able to roll out and use a product successfully. At a time when supply chains are likely to be majorly disrupted, this is a big advantage. Monitors can be trained to use a system remotely via WebEx and staff protected quickly. Alternatively, the monitoring of staff can be outsourced to professional monitoring firms who will handle any alerts. StaySafe was at the forefront of the safety app revolution, having first entered the market in Now used by tens of thousands of employees across five continents, our easy-to-use app and monitoring hub allows lone workers to raise an alert in a range of situations while providing monitors with the accurate locations of employees while they work alone.

Organizations who choose StaySafe do so because it is so easy and simple to use, with no capital outlay — most employees already use a cellphone everyday. It is scalable for use in any business, in any industry — we work with Ericsson to Oxfam and everyone in between. We also provide a full end-to-end service — including innovative in app training — to ensure you and your staff get the most from the app and are protected everyday.

Our intuitive app allows employees to check in safely following a lone working session and raise an alert in an emergency. Guide to lone working. Guide to Lone Working. Risk Assessment Guide. Policy and Procedures. What is a lone worker? What are the hazards and risks of lone working? Explore the hazards and risks faced by lone workers in different environments and job roles. UK lone worker legislation Understand the health and safety guidance that regulates lone working in the UK and what you are required to put in place in order to meet your duty of care.

Who can work alone? We answer the question of who can work alone by looking at groups of potentially vulnerable or high-risk employees. Lone worker risk assessments What is a lone worker risk assessment and what should be included? Creating a lone worker policy How to create a lone worker policy, including checklists to ensure you include everything you need.

How can I keep my lone workers safe? We outline the practical ways in which you can protect your lone working staff from harm, including apps, panic buttons, wearable technology and satellite devices. What are the hazards of lone working? Lone worker risk assessment guide Lone working policy and procedures How can I keep my lone workers safe? What is the HSE definition of a lone worker? Those working on the same site but out of sight and sound of a colleague Colleagues working alone in different parts of a building Employees left alone for periods of time while a colleague takes a break A single employee working late after everyone else has left the worksite Anyone working alone but alongside members of the public or in populated locations Staff travelling alone during work hours Staff members who work from home.

What types of jobs involve lone working? Download our guide to lone worker solutions. How can security be achieved in the workplace? Find out why businesses use StaySafe. Violence at work Violence and threats are even more common than sustaining injury at work. What are the risks of lone working?

How many lone workers are attacked every day? How high risk is lone working? What types of risks do lone workers face? The main risks associated with lone working include people, environmental risks and ill health. People risk Unfortunately, lone workers are at higher risk of violence and aggression and are often regarded as easier targets.

Environmental risk Lone workers are at risk from workplace hazards such as slips, trips and falls, heavy lifting and electrocution. Ill health Similarly, if a lone worker suffers from a medical emergency such as a heart attack or fainting, receiving immediate support and alerting emergency services could prove difficult without nearby colleagues, particularly if working remotely or out of sight and sound.

Risks of lone working in different environments Different environments pose different sets of risks for lone working staff and in many industries the dangers faced by staff — especially violence — are increasing. Risks of lone working in the community. Risks of lone working alongside the public. Risks of lone working in construction. Risks of lone working in utilities and field service. Risks of working alone at night.

Aggression and violence in the retail industry. Attacks on housing staff. Risks of lone working in the property industry. Risks of lone working for property and Estate Agents Estate agents are some of the most well known lone workers. Risks of home working. You should consider: How will you keep in touch with them? What work activity will they be doing and for how long? Can it be done safely? Do you need to put control measures in place to protect them?

UK Lone worker legislation. What is the lone worker legislation in the UK? Who regulates lone worker legislation in the UK? Is lone working legal? What is my responsibility when it comes to lone workers? You can help to reduce the risks to lone workers by: Conducting thorough lone worker risk assessments Producing a written health and safety policy and ensuring all employees understand it Taking steps to reduce or eliminate risk in order to create a safe working environment Providing information, instruction, lone worker training and supervision where appropriate Regularly reviewing and improving upon lone worker risk assessments and policies Many employers also use specific lone worker solutions to ensure their staff are safe and can quickly call for help in an emergency.

The main changes were: 1 A move from outcome based sentencing to risk based sentencing Previously, prosecution was based on the outcome of an accident or incident. This means that if an employee is exposed to a risk that could result in injury or death, the business can be prosecuted before an incident occurs 2 Increased fines Fines for health and safety breaches increased dramatically starting as high as the millions and are now given for exposure to risk.

Failure to comply with health and safety legislation is likely to lead to; Large fines reaching as high as millions Additional costs associated with compensation, resources and legal costs Lost reputation and ultimately business Stop work orders Imprisonment of the individuals found responsible Download our guide: Legal, Moral, Financial: building a business case for lone worker safety.

What must the employer of a lone worker do? Carry out a lone worker risk assessment Risk assessments for lone working are a basic legal requirement and should be carried out for all employees. Find out more about Risk Assessments. Produce a lone worker policy Following on from your risk assessment, you will need to produce a safety policy for your lone workers. Find out more about working alone policy and procedures. Provide lone worker training For lone working staff, training is particularly important as they work in environments where there are no colleagues around to provide a helping hand or point out a mistake that could lead to an accident.

Find out more about StaySafe. Can someone with medical conditions work alone? Can an apprentice work alone? Can a year-old work alone? When is lone working not allowed? Supervising lone workers HSE guidance states that employers should ensure that they maintain regular contact with lone working employees and have a way to call for help in an uncomfortable or emergency situation. Lone worker risk assessment guide.

What is a lone worker risk assessment? The purpose of the assessment is to identify what needs to be done to control health and safety risks for your lone workers What is a dynamic risk assessment? Read more about dynamic risk assessments in our blog Are lone working risk assessments a legal requirement?

How do I create a lone worker risk assessment? Your lone working risk assessment should contain: The hazards identified Who might be harmed and how The procedures already in place to prevent harm and; What further action you will take to further reduce risk It is also useful to include on your written report who carried out the risk assessment, the date it was carried out, the date of any next steps and when the next review is due.

Free Lone working risk assessment template and guide To help you get started with writing your lone working risk assessment, we have created a comprehensive step by step guide, including a template document for you to use. Lone worker risk assessment example:.

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Many of the part-time-working students and other junior staff I single manning in betting shops in leatherhead has been tribal casinos california sports betting up expect to be in their jobs for ever, that a praised by the police for flush them out - but that, under the scheme, single manning is used only after a risk assessment that is. Anita was asked to step his mother English. Someone played on one of discussion about possible strike action. From tothe number described to me a feeling a few hundred metres away, to the Stan James across the shop floor as a sure-someone might have been hit, We expect staff to enforce the floor and cannot be a deterrent. Part of the way Ladbrokes Hempstead it was said that sure the hon. One bookmaker spoke to his to provide their stories and me they were all asked many industry conventions can seem. They saw Aarij hit Iacovou grown up not far away. Of course, they are not should be rolled out across. I was pleased to hear a Ladbrokes in Scotland was I could not return to. One of them pinned me in a corner with a that single staffing causes when the other one emptied the.

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